MEET R.E.S.E.T. BY JEM

DFW food and fitness

Welcome to the second installment in our DFW birth professional provider series! Giving you a more detailed look at some of the resources available for your prenatal and postpartum seasons. Sarah recently sat down with R.E.S.E.T. by JEM, a holistic and wellness services company based in Ft. Worth. They believe a happy, healthy, healed pregnancy starts with food and fitness first! R.E.S.E.T. stands for Rejuvenate, Empower, Stimulate, Enlighten, and Transform; all things we could use a little more of in our lives!

Improving Generational Health Increases Generational Wealth

These words are the force that drive Jaquatta Klein, owner and operator of R.E.S.E.T. by JEM, when she sits down with a client to form his/or her perfect personalized program. R.E.S.E.T. by JEM is a holistic health practice offering preventative care programs designed to provide customized tools, direction, and one-on-one coaching to help you towards a healthier you. A quick look on her website will show you that while she serves retired senior citizens and post-surgery patients, her major focus is on the health and well-being of new mothers. With over 6 years of experience in preventive care, Jaquatta is able to assist new mom’s through this special time and form a program specifically designed to help her feel enlightened and empowered.

How does she do it?

While every individuals program will vary, all programs offer flexibility and are centered around fitness, nutrition, and education. Through her own struggles and accomplishments Jaquatta learned that by transforming your daily routine and incorporating healthy habits you can play an active role in ensuring you don’t lose yourself along your journey to creating new life. As your nutritional coach, Jaquatta offers to organize your pantry, demonstrate how to better organize your grocery list, guide you through maneuvering the distracting grocery aisles, and educate you on meal prepping. A full list of her services can be found on her webpage: https://www.resetbyjem.org/our-services/

Jaquatta also teaches a series of prenatal and mommy-and-me fitness classes, including water aerobics, with Oh Baby! Fitness through Texas Health in Ft Worth. For a full list of classes and times you can go to https://www.ohbabyfitness.com/ and enter “Ft Worth, TX” into the search bar.

How long are the visits?

You can expect to spend around 1 hour for the initial consultation at her main office in Arlington.. The consultation will serve as a time for you to discuss your health background, lifestyle, goals, and form a plan. Remember, the plans are customized to fit your goals and lifestyle!

How do I schedule a consultation? 

It’s simple! Just head on over to her page and fill out her contact form: https://www.resetbyjem.org/contact-us/

Thank you, Jaquatta, for meeting with me and allowing me to learn more about your practice!

-Doula Sarah

MOVEMENT – A FRIEND OF LABOR

DFW MOVEMENT

Birth doesn’t have to be a dramatic movie depiction of a woman laying on her back with her legs in stirrups!  This version of labor, known as the lithotomy position, has been widely used for the last 200 years. Prior to this time, the recorded history of birthing indicates upright birth postures were used across the world, regardless of culture or economic development. What if you combined that upright birth posture with movement?  Here are a few suggestions for aiding labor progression by utilizing one key tool: MOVEMENT!

As a Birth Doula and Dancing For Birth™ instructor, I have found utilizing movement, through dancing and upright positions to have overwhelmingly positive effects for the laboring mother.

When a mother is allowed to move into the surges she is experiencing, she becomes in-tune to her body’s needs.  Dancing during pregnancy and birth has many benefits, including the reduction of stress and tension, the true enemy of an easy labor and birth.  Low impact exercise also helps increase the body’s release of  pain killing endorphins and the flow of Oxytocin, the hormone that brings about labor naturally.

During Dancing For Birth™ classes, you will learn exercises to keep you moving during pregnancy, as well as prepare you for labor.  These classes can help shorten the length of labor, reduce your risk of interventions and aid in optimal fetal positioning.  While attending DFB classes, your pelvic outlet opens wider and your comfort level increase.  Ultimately, you are helping your baby rotate and descend into a better position with each class.

Movement keeps you in an upright position allowing you to benefit from gravity. When laboring, keep in mind, that the bed is not the FOCUS of the room.  The bed is a tool for labor!  Try utilizing this tool by resting over it while making use of a birth ball. It may also help you balance while doing a birth preparation position, such as squats or lunges.  When a laboring mom is confined to the bed, her pelvic outlet is restricted and her sacrum is compressed.  In order to create more space for  baby in your pelvis, get up on your feet and use gravity to your birthing advantage.

The discomfort of labor can be intensified by being on your back consistently.  Other tools to consider utilizing are walking, swaying, or even hip circles on your birth ball to help you through those labor pains and contractions.  These movement tools can stimulate mechanoreceptors. Essentially, pleasurable sensations reach the brain  much quicker than uncomfortable labor pains.  In some cases, the movement tool can be a distraction to overcome contractions.  Get your partner to help support you in the upright movements and listen to your bodies natural cues to move. Movement can be an instinctual coping method.

Lastly, movement can help your baby descend down and help you progress in labor. The upright labor position combined with movement creates more productive contractions  by placing  pressure on your cervix.  As you move your hips instinctively, asymmetric space is created in the pelvis.  This allows more room for your baby to navigate through and could lead to an easier labor and birth.  As you create your own language of movement during this life changing experience, you are allowing your body to open up to its most optimal potential.

Overall, being able to move about freely during labor could help shorten the duration of your labor.  Only you will know what feels right in the moment.  Begin practicing movement now (dancing, walking, swaying, birth ball techniques) and build your stamina for labor.  Surround yourself with an exceptional birth team, rest when needed, and bust a move when your body cues it.  Dance through labor like no one is watching!

Nicole Moffitt

12 DAYS OF DOULA CHRISTMAS

DFW DOULA CHRISTMAS

Ever wonder how a doula supports their clients? Well in honor of the holidays our group decided to put together a new rendition of  12 Days of Christmas, packed full of gifts doulas can give to each of the families they support! Of course we wished it was more like 100 days of Christmas because 12 just barely scratches the surface. If you’re interested in learning more about what a Doula can do for you, we’re always happy to chat. Wishing you and yours a wonderful Christmas and a Happy New Year!

On the 12th Day of Christmas, my Doula gave to me

1 fully supported birth

On the 12th Day of Christmas, my Doula gave to me

2 back rubs
and 1 fully supported birth

On the 12th Day of Christmas, my Doula gave to me

3 belly lifts
2 back rubs
and 1 fully supported birth

On the 12th Day of Christmas, my Doula gave to me

4 check in texts
3 belly lifts
2 back rubs
and 1 fully supported birth

On the 12th Day of Christmas, my Doula gave to me

5 hypnosis scripts 
4 check in texts
3 belly lifts
2 back rubs
and 1 fully supported birth

On the 12th Day of Christmas, my Doula gave to me

6 oils diffusing
5 hypnosis scripts 
4 check in texts
3 belly lifts
2 back rubs
and 1 fully supported birth

On the 12th Day of Christmas, my Doula gave to me

7 bellies dancing 
6 oils diffusing
5 hypnosis scripts 
4 check in texts
3 belly lifts
2 back rubs
and 1 fully supported birth

On the 12th Day of Christmas, my Doula gave to me

8 positions for pushing 
7 bellies dancing 
6 oils diffusing
5 hypnosis scripts 
4 check in texts
3 belly lifts
2 back rubs
and 1 fully supported birth

On the 12th Day of Christmas, my Doula gave to me

9 curbs a walking 
8 positions for pushing 
7 bellies dancing 
6 oils diffusing
5 hypnosis scripts 
4 check in texts
3 belly lifts
2 back rubs
and 1 fully supported birth

On the 12th Day of Christmas, my Doula gave to me

10 legs a lunging
9 curbs a walking 
8 positions for pushing 
7 bellies dancing 
6 oils diffusing
5 hypnosis scripts 
4 check in texts
3 belly lifts
2 back rubs
and 1 fully supported birth

On the 12th Day of Christmas, my Doula gave to me

11 studies for reading 
10 legs a lunging
9 curbs a walking 
8 positions for pushing 
7 bellies dancing 
6 oils diffusing
5 hypnosis scripts 
4 check in texts
3 belly lifts
2 back rubs
and 1 fully supported birth

On the 12th Day of Christmas, my Doula gave to me

12 hips a squeezing
11 studies for reading 
10 legs a lunging
9 curbs a walking 
8 positions for pushing 
7 bellies dancing 
6 oils diffusing
5 hypnosis scripts 
4 check in texts
3 belly lifts
2 back rubs
and
 1 FULLY SUPPORTED BIRTH!

Happy Holidays from our family to yours!

Katie, Nicole, Amber and Sarah

MEET TAYLOR MADE MIDWIFERY

DFW TAYLOR MADE MIDWIFERY

Welcome to the first entry of our provider interview series! The purpose of this series is to provide our network with personal access to health care providers within the DFW metroplex. Each month we will spotlight a new provider, check back in as our list expands!

First up, we get acquainted with Taylor Made Midwifery!

 

I (Sarah) recently had the opportunity to sit down with Susan Taylor LM, CPM, the woman behind Taylor Made Midwifery. She’s a small practice located just outside south Ft Worth. From the moment I walked into her office (aka, her home) I felt the warmth that embodies what she so endlessly worked to create, her family centered home practice. Her midwifery practice blossomed out of Beautiful Beginnings Birthing Center,  which was actually the first birthing center to call Ft. Worth home! Susan worked alongside the experienced Amanda Prouty, LM, CPM for the first 4 years of her midwifery career. I asked her what drove her to midwifery work to which she responded with the birth stories of her children and previous work as a birth doula.

“I kept feeling this tug, I knew where I needed to be. So, 4 months after I had my son I dove in”

Four months after the VBAC (vaginal birth after cesarean) experience with her fourth child, Susan began her midwifery journey. She also credits this experience as the moment she realized her purpose was to help other women achieve the same. While she welcomes all families, Susan especially prides herself in supporting her clients through their own VBAC journeys. Susan is now a mother to 4 busy young bodies, a midwife, and active within the surrogacy community. When she is not at a band performance, a karate lesson, a choir recital, or welcoming new babies, she is working closely with a surrogacy agency to support their surrogate families. As our time grew to a close my last question to her was “where do you see yourself going from here?”

“I see myself providing personal care to my clients; being there for all my kid’s activities and watching them as they go off to school. I see myself doing exactly what I’m doing now.”

Thank you, Susan, for taking the time to share your story with me. Congratulations on opening the door to your dreams!

Taylor Made Midwifery opened her doors to her home office in September of 2017, however still providing birthing center births at The Nest Midwives located in Mansfield, Tx. To learn more about Taylor Made Midwifery or schedule an appointment, please visit her website.

 

Susan Taylor LM, CPM
Taylor Made Midwifery located in Ft. Worth, TX
https://taylormademidwifery.com/

 

-Sarah Ryan

WARNING SIGNS OF POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION

DFW POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION

For approximately 80% of new parents, the first two weeks following birth can be quite a hormonal affair. You and your new baby are trying to get to know each other. There are many struggles to connect with a new baby and to ensure that you can do this “parenting thing. The most common being lack of sleep, mood swings, irritability, and at times uncontrollable crying. And then there’s the breastfeeding vs. bottle feeding debate and whether or not the baby is getting enough to eat. Having a strong support system and time to adjust to parenthood is crucial to overcoming this normal “baby blues” period.

Postpartum mood disorders are the most common complication of childbirth. Approximately 20% of mothers will experience some form of postpartum depression and/or postpartum anxiety. Before I go any further, it is absolutely important to know that a) you are not alone, and b) none of this is your fault. While postpartum mood disorders can often leave you feeling inadequate, this simply is not true. You are NOT a bad parent and with treatment, your symptoms can improve. Treatment will vary based on your individual needs. It may include medication, therapy, or a combination of both. It is also important to note that if you are suffering from a postpartum mood disorder, there is a 50% chance that your partner will also suffer from a similar disorder.

But what happens when the baby blues to not improve? What are the warnings signs of postpartum depression? When should you consider seeking professional help? To help answer these questions, I recently sat down with Bina Bird, MA, LMFT of Haslet Counseling.

Mrs. Bird highlighted the most common warning signs of postpartum depression with me. They include excessive crying, constant feelings of panic and/or nervousness, having difficulty in decision making, excessive guilt, feelings of hopelessness, loss of appetite, inability to sleep, obsessive thoughts, and even thoughts of death (yourself and your baby).

Research shows that if you are experiencing any of the following risk factors, you should discuss them with your medical provider so you can plan accordingly. According to Postpartum Support International risk factors and warning signs of postpartum depression include:

  • Personal or family history of depression, anxiety, or postpartum depression
  • Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD or PMS)
  • Insufficient support in caring for yourself or your baby
  • Experiencing financial and/or marital stress
  • Infertility
  • Experience with a complicated pregnancy or birth or are having difficulties with breastfeeding
  • Recent major life event
  • Parent to multiples
  • Baby had to spend time in the NICU,
  • Thyroid imbalance
  • Any form of diabetes (type 1, type 2 or gestational)

As I mentioned earlier, postpartum anxiety (also known as perinatal anxiety) can also be prevalent in new mothers. Postpartum Support International lists the most common signs of postpartum anxiety. They include excessive worrying, continuous racing thoughts, sleep and appetite disturbances, the inability to sit still, physical symptoms such as dizziness and nausea, and a nagging feeling that the worst is going to happen. Risk factors for perinatal anxiety include a personal (or family) history of anxiety, previous bouts of perinatal anxiety, or thyroid imbalance.

It is important to trust your instincts, as you know yourself and your body better than anyone else. If you are experiencing ANY of these symptoms more than 2 weeks after giving birth, please seek out your medical provider or another medical professional.

What about managing postpartum depression? Self-care is not always easy after giving birth, but it is important for your mental state to find time to take care of YOU. Try to eat as nutritiously as possible – this not only helps you feel better, but should you decide to breastfeed it can help with building and maintaining your milk supply. Exercise is also important – go for daily walks. Fresh air is always a good thing and it’s good for both you and the baby to get outside. It is also important to avoid, or at least limit, your intake of substances such as caffeine, alcohol, and nicotine. Sleep is very important as well – while it is not always easy, try sleeping when the baby sleeps. It does not have to be every time the baby sleeps, but try to squeeze in an extra nap or two during the day.

If you are unsure if what you are feeling is normal, reach out to your medical care provider or seek out a therapist. Do NOT be afraid to ask your family and close friends for help. Sometimes we want to appear as “super parents” and give the perception that everything is under control, when in reality we’ve lost control and need help. The problem lies in the fact that friends and family may not see that you need the help. Asking for help is nothing to be ashamed of; it does not mean you are weak. We all need help from time to time, and support from friends and family is crucial during this time.

If you are reading this because you know a new parent that is experiencing a postpartum mood disorder, there are ways in which you can help. Encourage these new parents to get rest when possible and to take time to care for themselves. Offer to help with housework, cook meals, or help take care of the baby. New parents can catch a nap or even get a shower – both of which are great ways to relieve stress! If you are comfortable doing so, encourage the new parent(s) in your life to seek support. Let them know that postpartum mood disorders are treatable. Reiterate to them that they are not alone in their journey, that this is not their fault, and they are wonderful parents who deserve to enjoy this time with their newborn baby.

Following a birth, postpartum doulas are another wonderful resource for any family. Postpartum doulas are trained to understand the needs of both newborn babies and their parents. Generally available for both daytime and overnight shifts, doulas can offer parents feeding support, tips for soothing babies, and education on normal newborn behavior.

In conclusion, remember that for most new parents, some form of postpartum mood disorder is a normal part of the parenting process. You are NOT alone in this and there are many resources that can help you during this time. There are plenty of resources available to you – friends, family, medical professionals, therapists, and postpartum doulas. The key is going to be asking for help.

 

Bina Bird is a Licensed Therapist based out of Haslet, TX, that specializes in maternal mental health. If you are local to the Dallas/Fort Worth area and would like to schedule a free consultation or an appointment, you can contact Bina by going to www.hasletcounseling.com

For more information on postpartum doulas, go to www.dfwbirthresource.com

Amber Gates

FRUSTRATION WHEN LATCHING?

DFW FRUSTRATION WHEN LATCHING

In honor of National Breastfeeding Month, this month’s blog topic addresses a common breastfeeding woe, frustration when latching. Often both mom AND baby feed off each other’s emotional state. As a CLC, I often hear “My baby just screams when I’m trying to latch him! He hates the breast!” Alternatively, I also hear “I just can’t seem to keep my baby awake to eat. She just wants to sleep all the time!” These are two issues that may be able to be fixed with one simple change: when you initiate the feed. By using the knowledge of newborn behavior and sleep states, this common complaint could be history.

 

Babies cycle through 5 different states:

  • Deep Sleep- This state is characterized by no movement of the eyes or limbs and shallow breathing. They don’t wake up for loud noises or when moved (picked up or put down.)
  • REM Sleep- Your baby is asleep but you will notice his eyes darting back and forth and some movement of the limbs, either stretching or startling. He might also let out little peeps or coos at this stage too letting you know they are no longer in a full deep sleep.
  • Quiet Alert- Although awake, these babies tend to stay still and process the world a bit. They’re often wide eyed  just taking it all in. They don’t make a lot of noise and they seem quite content.
  • Active Alert – Awake and ready for the world to know it! These babies are often moving around, bringing their arms and hands to their face, kicking their legs and moving their head side to side. They might be whining or fussing. This state is usually short lived and can move to crying very quickly.
  • Crying- This is the state everyone is familiar with- the crying baby. At this point, your baby is past the first hunger cues and is now very upset.

 

Many moms wait until their baby is active alert or crying to initiate a feed, often resulting in a long, unsuccessful, emotional and frustrating nursing session. This is when many women begin to think their baby doesn’t like the breast or that maybe she’s not making enough milk. In these situations, it’s best to hit the “reset button” with skin to skin. After initiating skin to skin (no shirts for mom or baby) babies tend to settle back to a quiet alert state, which is one of the best times to initiate a feed!

Additionally, latching can also be equally as hard if baby is in a deep sleep. It’s very hard to wake a baby from this state, which leads to a failed nursing session and a mom feeling helpless. “How do I keep my baby awake to eat?!” Babies don’t need to be awake to feed but they do need to at least be in a REM state to initiate. This is called dream feeding. The REM sleep state is one of the best times to feed a baby as they are typically much more patient and they’re happy you’re responding to their earliest hunger cues! No hangry baby here!

To recap: initiating feeds will be the easiest for mom and baby during the REM Sleep or Quiet Alert states. Trying to feed while your baby is in a deep sleep or crying will lead to frustration when latching. A baby’s sleep cycle last around 30 minutes. This means if you watch carefully you’ll have many opportunities to initiate a feed during a REM Sleep state. Rooming in at the hospital as well as at home can help you become familiar with your baby’s cues. Breastfeeding doesn’t have to be complicated and for many, making this simple change is enough to change those tearful nursing sessions into magical bonding moments!

 

Katie Ellis is a local CLC in the DFW area and offers breastfeeding counseling and classes.